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   NEW CELL PHONE TOWER CAUSES USER CALL INTERFERENCE  



CELL TOWER SITINGS TOO CLOSE TO EACH OTHER CAN CAUSE CELL PHONE INTERFERENCE PROBLEMS

 

 NEW CELLTOWERS SAT TOO CLOSE TO EACH OTHER CAN CAUSE CELL PHONE CALL INTERFERENCE PROBLEMS HINDERING E911 CALL CAPABILITY

 

By Jane Celltower

 

When siting cell towers too close to each other, cell phone interference problems can occur.  Echo effects, metalic voice and wobble effects, hearing other people talking on the line, dropped calls at times, can be vast, and troublesome, hindering E911 call capability.  Cell phone interference is a liability and safety cell tower siting issue, which is to be reported to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), as often as such problems occur.  Reports of cell phone interference problems to the FCC "within the first year of a new cell tower siting", have to be taken care of by the wireless service provider.   Reports of cell phone interference problems after a new tower siting, are not uncommon.   

 

§ 4.5 47 CFR Ch. I (10–1–09 Edition)

§ 4.5 Definitions of outage, special offices

and facilities, and 911 special

facilities.

(a) Outage is defined as a significant

degradation in the ability of an end

user to establish and maintain a channel

of communications as a result of

failure or degradation in the performance

of a communications provider’s

network.

 

HOW TO REPORT CELL PHONE CALL INTERFERENCE PROBLEMS TO THE FCC:

 

The Spectrum Enforcement Division, in conjunction with the Regional and Field Offices, is responsible for responding to complaints of broadcast station interference that involve violations of the Communications Act, and/or the Commission's rules, orders and station authorizations.

Broadcast stations that believe that they are experiencing interference from other stations and that such interference is the result of Commission rule, order or station authorization violations, may submit their complaints to: Federal Communications Commission, Enforcement Bureau, Spectrum Enforcement Division, 445 12th Street, SW, Washington, DC 20554.

Complaints must be in writing and must include as much of the following information as possible: (1) the call sign and address of the station experiencing the interference, (2) the telephone number of a contact person for the station, (3) the frequency on which the complaining station operates; (4) a detailed description of the nature of the interference, including the duration and frequency of the occurrence of interference; (5) the call sign and address of the station believed to be the source of the interference; (6) the frequency on which the alleged interfering station operates; (7) the provision of the Communications Act, Commission rule, order or station authorization believed to have been violated by the alleged source of the interference, and (8) any documentation supporting the alleged existence and cause of the interference.

 

Below is a noted document reference:

§ 4.5 Definitions of outage, special offices

and facilities, and 911 special

facilities.

(a) Outage is defined as a significant

degradation in the ability of an end

user to establish and maintain a channel

of communications as a result of

failure or degradation in the performance

of a communications provider’s

network.

(b) Special offices and facilities are defined

as major military installations,

key government facilities, nuclear

power plants, and those airports that

are listed as current primary (PR),

commercial service (CM), and reliever

(RL) airports in the FAA’s National

Plan of Integrated Airports Systems

(NPIAS) (as issued at least one calendar

year prior to the outage). The

member agencies of the National Communications

System (NCS) will determine

which of their locations are

‘‘major military installations’’ and

‘‘key government facilities.’’ 911 special

facilities are addressed separately

in paragraph (e) of this section.

(c) All outages that potentially affect

communications for at least 30 minutes

with any airport that qualifies as a

‘‘special office and facility’’ pursuant

to the preceding paragraph shall be reported

in accordance with the provisions

of §§ 4.11 and 4.13.

(d) A mission-affecting outage is defined

as an outage that is deemed critical

to national security/emergency

preparedness (NS/EP) operations of the

affected facility by the National Communications

System member agency

operating the affected facility.

(e) An outage that potentially affects

a 911 special facility occurs whenever:

(1) There is a loss of communications

to PSAP(s) potentially affecting at

least 900,000 user-minutes and: The failure

is neither at the PSAP(s) nor on

the premises of the PSAP(s); no reroute

for all end users was available;

and the outage lasts 30 minutes or

more; or

(2) There is a loss of 911 call processing

capabilities in one or more E–911

tandems/selective routers for at least

30 minutes duration; or

(3) One or more end-office or MSC

switches or host/remote clusters is isolated

from 911 service for at least 30

minutes and potentially affects at least

900,000 user-minutes; or

(4) There is a loss of ANI/ALI (associated

name and location information)

and/or a failure of location determination

equipment, including Phase II

equipment, for at least 30 minutes and

potentially affecting at least 900,000

user-minutes (provided that the ANI/

ALI or location determination equipment

was then currently deployed and

 

page 677

Federal Communications Commission § 4.9

in use, and the failure is neither at the

PSAP(s) or on the premises of the

PSAP(s)).

§ 4.7 Definitions of metrics used to determine

the general outage-reporting

threshold criteria.

(a) Administrative numbers are defined

as the telephone numbers used by communications

providers to perform internal

administrative or operational

functions necessary to maintain reasonable

quality of service standards.

(b) Assigned numbers are defined as

the telephone numbers working in the

Public Switched Telephone Network

under an agreement such as a contract

or tariff at the request of specific end

users or customers for their use. This

excludes numbers that are not yet

working but have a service order pending.

(c) Assigned telephone number minutes

are defined as the mathematical result

of multiplying the duration of an outage,

expressed in minutes, by the sum

of the number of assigned numbers (defined

in paragraph (b) of this section)

potentially affected by the outage and

the number of administrative numbers

(defined in paragraph (a) of this section)

potentially affected by the outage.

‘‘Assigned telephone number minutes’’

can alternatively be calculated

as the mathematical result of multiplying

the duration of an outage, expressed

in minutes, by the number of

working telephone numbers potentially

affected by the outage, where working

telephone numbers are defined as the

telephone numbers, including DID

numbers, working immediately prior to

the outage.

(d) DS3 minutes are defined as the

mathematical result of multiplying the

duration of an outage, expressed in

minutes, by the number of previously

operating DS3 circuits that were affected

by the outage.

(e) User minutes are defined as:

(1) Assigned telephone number minutes

(as defined in paragraph (c) of this

section), for telephony and for those

paging networks in which each individual

user is assigned a telephone

number;

(2) The mathematical result of multiplying

the duration of an outage, expressed

in minutes, by the number of

end users potentially affected by the

outage, for all other forms of communications.

(f) Working telephone numbers are defined

to be the sum of all telephone

numbers that can originate, or terminate

telecommunications. This includes,

for example, all working telephone

numbers on the customer’s side

of a PBX, or Centrex, or similar arrangement.

§ 4.9 Outage reporting requirements—

threshold criteria.

(a) Cable. All cable communications

providers shall submit electronically a

Notification to the Commission within

120 minutes of discovering that they

have experienced on any facilities that

they own, operate, lease, or otherwise

utilize, an outage of at least 30 minutes

duration that:

(1) Potentially affects at least 900,000

user minutes of telephony service;

(2) Affects at least 1,350 DS3 minutes;

(3) Potentially affects any special offices

and facilities (in accordance with

paragraphs (a) through (d) of § 4.5); or

(4) Potentially affects a 911 special

facility (as defined in paragraph (e) of

§ 4.5), in which case they also shall notify,

as soon as possible by telephone or

other electronic means, any official

who has been designated by the management

of the affected 911 facility as

the provider’s contact person for communications

outages at that facility,

and they shall convey to that person

all available information that may be

useful to the management of the affected

facility in mitigating the effects

of the outage on callers to that facility.

(DS3 minutes and user minutes are

defined in paragraphs (d) and (e) of

§ 4.7.) Not later than 72 hours after discovering

the outage, the provider shall

submit electronically an Initial Communications

Outage Report to the

Commission. Not later than thirty

days after discovering the outage, the

provider shall submit electronically a

Final Communications Outage Report

to the Commission. The Notification

and the Initial and Final reports shall

comply with all of the requirements of

§ 4.11.

(b) IXC or LEC tandem facilities.

 

 

Copyright - 2010,  Jane Celltower.  All Rights Reserved.